Safety & Health

174 posts

Safety Walk-Arounds: OSHA Factsheet

Safety Inspections, Safety Walk-Around, Safety Walk-About, GEMBA Walk, Safety Walk… the process goes by many different names.  However, the basis and benefit for conducting these routine safety walks are the same.

OSHA recently released a guidance document, Safety Walkarounds for Managers (74), on conducting effective safety walks that improves hazard recognition and communication about identified hazards with employees.

Why conduct a safety walk?  Two reasons:

  1. Demonstrate management’s commitment to improving safety and health in your facility by identifying and mitigating hazards, and
  2. Allow management the opportunity to see for themselves how the safety and health program is working and it’s effectiveness in identifying and eliminating hazards.

The document provides a brief overview on pre-inspection, inspection, and post-inspection practices that can be applied in virtually every working environment.

Risk Assessment Tool – Video & Infographic

 

The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work recently produced a video detailing the risk assessment process found in it’s Risk Assessment Infographic (41).  The video details the importance of the proper risk assessment procedures and the difficulties often faced by businesses.  4 simple steps are outlined to aid in the risk assessment process and follow a typical PDCA / Deming Wheel process analysis approach:

  1. Prepare
  2. Identify & Evaluate
  3. Set up an Action Plan
  4. Report

Source: EU-OSHA

Training Requirements per the OSHA Standards

Training Requirements in OSHA Standards

Have questions on what training is required for a particular OSHA standard? Look no further.  OSHA has published a resource (Training Requirements in OSHA Standards (555)) for all of the OSHA standards.  In this booklet, the training requirements contained in OSHA’s standards are organized into five categories of OSHA standards: General Industry, Maritime, Construction, Agriculture, and Federal Employee Programs. This booklet identifies the training requirements in specific OSHA standards. For information on training techniques and resources for developing training programs, please see Resource for Development and Delivery of Training to Workers. Continue reading

Free Safety Toolbox Talks and Resources

Toolbox Safety Talk Resources

 

Racking your brain trying to think of a topic for tomorrow’s toolbox talk?  Look no further than Gempler’s Safety Training Sheets and you’ll be well on your way.  With a wide range of topics pre-canned, pick the most relevant one, and modify, as needed, to fit your workplace.  Topics include:

  • Ergonomics
  • Respirators
  • Heat Stress
  • Hazard Communication
  • Forklift Safety
  • Confined Spaces
  • PPE
  • Portable Power Tools
  • LOTO
  • Hot Work
  • General Safety
  • …and much more

Source: Gempler’s

Effective Safety Committees – How to get yours up to speed

MEMIC recently put together an excellent guide on effective Safety Committees.

What is a Safety Committee?  A Safety Committee is a group of concerned individuals who have the overall safety and well-being of the employees and the success of the company in mind. Forming safety committees is an easy and effective way to improve the safety and health of the workplace. From an employer’s perspective, safety committees are great because they get employees involved and focused on keeping their workplace safe, on reducing accidents, and on increasing productivity. From an employee’s perspective, safety committees provide a safe venue where individuals can express their safety concerns, ask safety-related questions, or offer suggestions for improvement.

The purpose of the Safety Committee is to get more employees actively involved in safety, to eliminate accidents, and to help create a corporate culture that embraces safety. A Safety Committee consists of individuals gathered together to:

  • complete self-inspections
  • review workplace accidents and complete accident investigations
  • recommend corrective actions
  • express their safety concerns
  • review and improve safety policies and programs
  • suggest and coordinate safety training

Continue reading

Preventing Serious Injuries & Fatalities (SIFs)

  • Over the past decade non-serious workplace injuries have decreased, but fatalities have decreased at a much slower rate.
  • The present study findings call into question decades-long-held assumptions in the safety community.
  • Research results show that contributing factors are different between less-serious events and SIF events.
  • Precursors to SIFs exist in most organizations and can be identified and measured.
  • New paradigms are required to influence step changes in improving serious injury and fatality (SIF).

Continue reading

FAQ about Tag Lines for Lifts

Definition:  Tag lines, per 1926.1401, means a rope (usually fiber) attached to a lifted load for purposes of controlling load spinning and pendular motions or used to stabilize a bucket or magnet during material handling operations.

  • 1910.180(h)(3)(xvi)  states “…A tag or restraint line shall be used when the rotation of the load is hazardous.”
  • 1926.1417(w) says “A tag or restraint line must be used if necessary to prevent rotation of the load that would be hazardous.”
  • 1926.1431(k)(5) regulates “tag lines must be used when necessary to control the platform.”

When to use:

  • The load suspended by the crane is likely to swing back and forth (due to wind or other external factors) creating a control hazard.
  • The movement or rotation of the load causes a hazardous condition.
  • To help orient a load for proper placement or connection upon landing

Continue reading

Leading Indicators in Occupational Safety and Health

Leading Indicators

The Campbell Institute has conducted a multi-year research study on leading indicators in the Environmental, Health and Safety field, with particular attention to Occupational Health and Safety.  They have published 3 documents on their research on leading indicators that contain a wealth of information from industry leaders and visionaries.

Great information and resources for companies looking to move from a lagging indicator performance measurement system to a system that is designed to identify problems in the early stages for corrective action implementation.  The documents provide case studies on what some of the top companies in the world have implemented with regards to safety and health leading indicators.



Discussions on leading indicators that are based on: risk assessment, hazard id, risk profiling, preventive and corrective actions, management of change process, learning systems, EHS management system evaluations, auditing, discipline, recognition, communication, training, compliance, perception, engagement, permits, and more.

Source: The Campbell Institute

AIHA Publishes Body of Knowledge on IAQ, Respiratory Protection, and Direct Read Instruments

aiha

AIHA has begun publishing technical documents that represent the “body of knowledge” that a competent and skillful practitioner should possess.  The documents are available for free on AIHA’s website and currently consists of the following:

More BoK documents are in development.

Source: AIHA BoK

OSHA Recordkeeping and Recordability: Medical Treatment vs. First Aid

OSHA Recordability Medical Treatment First Aid

Determining what constitutes an OSHA recordable injury can often be a science in itself.  Luckily, the good folks at JJ Keller have put together a list of medical treatments (recordable) vs. first aid (non-recordable) for your reference.  Care categories include:

  • Visits to health care professionals
  • Cuts, lacerations, punctures, abrasions
  • Inoculations
  • Splinters
  • Strains, sprains, dislocations
  • Burns, skin rashes, blisters
  • Bruises, contusions
  • Medications
  • Oxygen
  • Physical therapy (PT)
  • Loss of consciousness

Click below for a .pdf copy of the summary document.

OSHA Recordability: Medical Treatment vs. First Aid (1560)

Want to know what is considered first aid in the eyes of OSHA 29 CFR 1904.7.b.5.ii?  Download OSHA’s first aid list below.

OSHA First Aid List (992)

Source: JJ Keller

Occupational Health and Safety Videos for Training and Awareness

worksafebc

If you haven’t had the opportunity, check out WorkSafeBC’s YouTube page.  With over 400 videos, they have something for everyone and are a great training resource.  The subject matter of the videos touches most all areas of occupational health and safety, including:

  • LOTO and electrical safety
  • GHS
  • Forklifts, powered industrial trucks, and mobile equipment
  • Struck-by
  • Fall protection
  • Confined spaces
  • Hot work
  • Asbestos
  • Indoor air quality
  • & much more

Click below to visit WorkSafeBC’s YouTube page

wsbcyoutube

Source: YouTube WorkSafeBC

Ergonomics: MSD Prevention Toolkit

msd prevention

Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are among the most frequently reported causes of lost or restricted work time.

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) MSDs account for over 600,000 work related injuries and illnesses (34% of all lost workdays).
  • Direct costs attributable to MSDs exceeds $20 billion per year.
  • Indirect costs may be 3-5 times higher.
  • $1 of every $3 of Worker’s Compensation costs are spent on MSDs.
  • Mean costs for an upper extremity MSD case are $8,070 vs. $4,075 for all types of work-related injury.

Canada’s Occupational Health and Safety Council of Ontario has put together an excellent toolbox on assessment methods and training for work related MSDs.  Check it out HERE.

Source: Institute for Work & Health