AIHA Publishes Body of Knowledge on IAQ, Respiratory Protection, and Direct Read Instruments

aiha

AIHA has begun publishing technical documents that represent the “body of knowledge” that a competent and skillful practitioner should possess.  The documents are available for free on AIHA’s website and currently consists of the following:

More BoK documents are in development.

Source: AIHA BoK


OSHA Recordkeeping and Recordability: Medical Treatment vs. First Aid

OSHA Recordability Medical Treatment First Aid

Determining what constitutes an OSHA recordable injury can often be a science in itself.  Luckily, the good folks at JJ Keller have put together a list of medical treatments (recordable) vs. first aid (non-recordable) for your reference.  Care categories include:

  • Visits to health care professionals
  • Cuts, lacerations, punctures, abrasions
  • Inoculations
  • Splinters
  • Strains, sprains, dislocations
  • Burns, skin rashes, blisters
  • Bruises, contusions
  • Medications
  • Oxygen
  • Physical therapy (PT)
  • Loss of consciousness

Click below for a .pdf copy of the summary document.

OSHA Recordability: Medical Treatment vs. First Aid

Want to know what is considered first aid in the eyes of OSHA 29 CFR 1904.7.b.5.ii?  Download OSHA’s first aid list below.

OSHA First Aid List

Source: JJ Keller


Occupational Health and Safety Videos for Training and Awareness

worksafebc

If you haven’t had the opportunity, check out WorkSafeBC’s YouTube page.  With over 400 videos, they have something for everyone and are a great training resource.  The subject matter of the videos touches most all areas of occupational health and safety, including:

  • LOTO and electrical safety
  • GHS
  • Forklifts, powered industrial trucks, and mobile equipment
  • Struck-by
  • Fall protection
  • Confined spaces
  • Hot work
  • Asbestos
  • Indoor air quality
  • & much more

Click below to visit WorkSafeBC’s YouTube page

wsbcyoutube

Source: YouTube WorkSafeBC


Ergonomics: MSD Prevention Toolkit

msd prevention

Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are among the most frequently reported causes of lost or restricted work time.

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) MSDs account for over 600,000 work related injuries and illnesses (34% of all lost workdays).
  • Direct costs attributable to MSDs exceeds $20 billion per year.
  • Indirect costs may be 3-5 times higher.
  • $1 of every $3 of Worker’s Compensation costs are spent on MSDs.
  • Mean costs for an upper extremity MSD case are $8,070 vs. $4,075 for all types of work-related injury.

Canada’s Occupational Health and Safety Council of Ontario has put together an excellent toolbox on assessment methods and training for work related MSDs.  Check it out HERE.

Source: Institute for Work & Health


OSHA Publishes Rule for Confined Spaces in Construction

confinedspace

 
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a final rule to increase protections for construction workers in confined spaces.

Manholes, crawl spaces, tanks and other confined spaces are not intended for continuous occupancy. They are also difficult to exit in an emergency. People working in confined spaces face life-threatening hazards including toxic substances, electrocutions, explosions and asphyxiation.

Last year, two workers were asphyxiated while repairing leaks in a manhole, the second when he went down to save the first – which is not uncommon in cases of asphyxiation in confined spaces.

“In the construction industry, entering confined spaces is often necessary, but fatalities like these don’t have to happen,” said Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “This new rule will significantly improve the safety of construction workers who enter confined spaces. In fact, we estimate that it will prevent about 780 serious injuries every year.”

The rule will provide construction workers with protections similar to those manufacturing and general industry workers have had for more than two decades, with some differences tailored to the construction industry. These include requirements to ensure that multiple employers share vital safety information and to continuously monitor hazards – a safety option made possible by technological advances after the manufacturing and general industry standards were created.

“This rule will save lives of construction workers,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “Unlike most general industry worksites, construction sites are continually evolving, with the number and characteristics of confined spaces changing as work progresses. This rule emphasizes training, continuous worksite evaluation and communication requirements to further protect workers’ safety and health.”

Compliance assistance material and additional information is available on OSHA’s Confined Spaces in Construction Web page.


Excavation and Trenching Safety – Handout, Quiz & Answers

Wisconsin Safety

The Wisconsin Oil & Gas Industry Safety Alliance has produced a fantastic presentation/handout on excavation and trenching safety, including a quiz with answers.  Check out what they put together.

You may encounter trenching and excavation operations on site. Therefore, it is important that you are aware of the potential hazards. By understanding the hazards; providing adequate work zone traffic control; using protective equipment such as trench boxes; having a properly trained, competent person on site to monitor the trenching operations; and instituting a written program that emphasizes planning prevention, and training; excavation-related injuries and fatalities can be prevented.

Take a look at the handout HERE

Quiz questions (10) provided HERE

Answers to the quiz provided HERE

Source: Wisconsin Oil & Gas Industry Safety Alliance


OSHA eTools, vTools and eMatrices


OSHA has established a system of tools (eTools and the eMatrices) that are “stand-alone,” interactive, Web-based training tools on occupational safety and health topics. They are highly illustrated and utilize graphical menus. Some also use expert system modules, which enable the user to answer questions, and receive reliable advice on how OSHA regulations apply to their work site. Selected eTools are available as downloadable files for off-line use. Addtionally, there are Expert Advisors (based solely on expert systems) and v-Tools which are prevention video training tools.

eTools

eTools en Español

Ergonomics eTools

eMatrix

Expert Advisors

Prevention Videos (v-Tools)

Source: OSHA.gov


GHS Infographic – Only the Facts

Sitehawk.com recently published an infographic detailing the pertinent facts relating to the implementation of GHS.  While GHS has historically focused on the international community, with early adoption by the European Union and Japan, the GHS trend is moving west and will definitely be in the spotlight in the U.S. in 2012. GHS has already had and will continue to have profound effects on chemical data management initiatives, both for companies that must author and publish material safety data sheets (M)SDS for their chemical products, as well as those companies that must manage (M)SDS and related chemical data for onsite chemical inventories.  Below is a summary of the highlights.

Source: Sitehawk.com


MAK Collection for Occupational Health and Safety Now Available Online – FREE

The MAK Collection for Occupational Health and Safety now is available on-line and free.  It provides the German recommended exposure limits with documentation for chemicals used in Germany and many other countries.  The MAK-values are daily 8-hour time-weighed average values and apply to healthy adults. Substance-specific acceptable peak concentrations, including the highest possible duration of such peaks, are defined. If the substance can be taken up through the skin, this is indicated.  The MAKs have been collected and evaluated by the Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area – part of the DFG, the German Research Foundation.  The MAK values are similar to the ACGIH TLVs and documentation.

You can find the publication HERE

Source: Wiley Online Library


Free Webinar: Improving the Quality of Industrial Hygiene Air Sampling Data Through Proper Field Practices

TestAmerica is hosting a free webinar on “Improving the Quality of Industrial Hygiene Air Sampling Data Through Proper Field Practices” on September 20.  The webinar will be presented by Mike McGee, CIH and will provide a basic overview on improving the quality of IH data and avoiding common pitfalls.

Variability in sampling data can result from: the skill level and attention of the person performing the sampling, equipment and sampling media, variability of air sampling flow/sampling rate, recording sampling time accurately, environmental factors, documentation, the representativeness of the samples collected, variation in contaminant concentration during sampling, and transportation of samples from the field to the laboratory.

Topics will include:

  • Sources of field variability
  • Why air volume is only half of the equation
  • What you should know about air sampling pump calibration
  • Field data collection accuracy and adjustments
  • Field data documentation
  • Pitfalls to avoid

Register for the webinar HERE.

Source: TestAmerica


Globally Harmonized System (GHS) Introductory Overview & Webinar

The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labeling of chemicals.  The GHS provides 3 basic elements for classification and labeling:

  • Define health, physical & environmental hazards
  • Classify the hazards
  • Communicate the hazards throughout the workforce via labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS) – note: comparison of SDS and MSDS

(For a side-by-side comparison of the current hazard communication standard and the new standard, click HERE.)

While not a regulation or a standard, GHS is an attempt to standardize the method in which hazards are communicated in the workplace.  It is anticipated that application of the GHS will:

  • Enhance the protection of human health and the environment by providing an internationally comprehensible system,
  • Provide a recognized framework to develop regulations for those countries without existing systems,
  • Facilitate international trade in chemicals whose hazards have been identified on an international basis,
  • Reduce the need for testing and evaluation against multiple classification systems.

Benefits to companies include:

  • A safer work environment and improved relations with employees,
  • An increase in efficiency and reduced costs from compliance with hazard communication regulations,
  • Application of expert systems resulting in maximizing expert resources and minimizing labor and costs,
  • Facilitation of electronic transmission systems with international scope,
  • Expanded use of training programs on health and safety,
  • Reduced costs due to fewer accidents and illnesses,
  • Improved corporate image and credibility.

(more…)


AIHA Releases IH Calculator App

AIHA recently released the free IH Calculator LITE  app, a calculator that aids industrial hygienists in performing OH&S calculations quickly and efficiently on their mobile device.  Topics include: Noise, Heat Stress, Ventilation, Exposure Assessment and is complimented with a range of conversions such as volume, distance, pressure, temperature, TLVs, and more.  The app is currently only available on Apple products (iOS).

Source: AIHA