Construction


ASSP Provides Useful Guidance Document on New Silica Regulation

The Industrial Hygiene Practice Specialty of the American Society of Safety Professionals recently released a Silica Resource Guide for Contractors.  The goal of the Silica Resource Guide is to help contractors, safety professionals, and other stakeholders better understand the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1053 and 29 CFR 1926.1153.  

The guide, while brief, is full of useful links to help employers navigate the updated regulations, with an easy to use FAQ format.  For example:

Question: What is Table 1 and how is it applied?
Answer: Table 1 is a tool provided in the OSHA silica construction standard that lays out specific tasks common to the construction industry and describes ways to control employee exposure to silica. Examples include wet methods and dust collection vacuum attachments. The intent was to provide practical solutions to reduce exposures to respirable crystalline silica (RCS). OSHA has also created detailed fact sheets for Table 1 operations that may be helpful to your operations. OSHA plans to make additions to Table 1 and will reopen comments later in 2018, pending the regulatory agenda calendar.

The Silica Resource Guide provides silica-related resources on:

  • OSHA and Organizational resources
  • Table 1 interpretation
  • Air sampling requirements
  • Objective data
  • Medical surveillance
  • Respiratory protection
  • OSHA interpretations and enforcement guidance, and
  • Training

OSHA Publishes Rule for Confined Spaces in Construction

confinedspace

 
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a final rule to increase protections for construction workers in confined spaces.

Manholes, crawl spaces, tanks and other confined spaces are not intended for continuous occupancy. They are also difficult to exit in an emergency. People working in confined spaces face life-threatening hazards including toxic substances, electrocutions, explosions and asphyxiation.

Last year, two workers were asphyxiated while repairing leaks in a manhole, the second when he went down to save the first – which is not uncommon in cases of asphyxiation in confined spaces.

“In the construction industry, entering confined spaces is often necessary, but fatalities like these don’t have to happen,” said Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “This new rule will significantly improve the safety of construction workers who enter confined spaces. In fact, we estimate that it will prevent about 780 serious injuries every year.”

The rule will provide construction workers with protections similar to those manufacturing and general industry workers have had for more than two decades, with some differences tailored to the construction industry. These include requirements to ensure that multiple employers share vital safety information and to continuously monitor hazards – a safety option made possible by technological advances after the manufacturing and general industry standards were created.

“This rule will save lives of construction workers,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “Unlike most general industry worksites, construction sites are continually evolving, with the number and characteristics of confined spaces changing as work progresses. This rule emphasizes training, continuous worksite evaluation and communication requirements to further protect workers’ safety and health.”

Compliance assistance material and additional information is available on OSHA’s Confined Spaces in Construction Web page.


Free Webinar: Work Zone Safety for Highway Construction (ANSI A10.47)

Scott Schneider, director of safety for the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America and chairman of the work group that developed the New ANSI A10.47 Standard, provided a detailed overview, via a webinar, about this new standard on “Work Zone Safety for Highway Construction”.  This comprehensive standard, effective February 24, 2010,  covers practices including Flagger Safety, Runover/Backover Prevention, Equipment Operator Safety, Illumination, Personal Protective Equipment, and more.

To view a copy of the webinar, click HERE.

A copy of the standard is available on the ANSI Website for $69.00.

Source: WorkZoneSafety.org

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