Safety

169 posts

Free Webinar: Improving the Quality of Industrial Hygiene Air Sampling Data Through Proper Field Practices

TestAmerica is hosting a free webinar on “Improving the Quality of Industrial Hygiene Air Sampling Data Through Proper Field Practices” on September 20.  The webinar will be presented by Mike McGee, CIH and will provide a basic overview on improving the quality of IH data and avoiding common pitfalls.

Variability in sampling data can result from: the skill level and attention of the person performing the sampling, equipment and sampling media, variability of air sampling flow/sampling rate, recording sampling time accurately, environmental factors, documentation, the representativeness of the samples collected, variation in contaminant concentration during sampling, and transportation of samples from the field to the laboratory.

Topics will include:

  • Sources of field variability
  • Why air volume is only half of the equation
  • What you should know about air sampling pump calibration
  • Field data collection accuracy and adjustments
  • Field data documentation
  • Pitfalls to avoid

Register for the webinar HERE.

Source: TestAmerica

Globally Harmonized System (GHS) Introductory Overview & Webinar

The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labeling of chemicals.  The GHS provides 3 basic elements for classification and labeling:

  • Define health, physical & environmental hazards
  • Classify the hazards
  • Communicate the hazards throughout the workforce via labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS) – note: comparison of SDS and MSDS

(For a side-by-side comparison of the current hazard communication standard and the new standard, click HERE.)

While not a regulation or a standard, GHS is an attempt to standardize the method in which hazards are communicated in the workplace.  It is anticipated that application of the GHS will:

  • Enhance the protection of human health and the environment by providing an internationally comprehensible system,
  • Provide a recognized framework to develop regulations for those countries without existing systems,
  • Facilitate international trade in chemicals whose hazards have been identified on an international basis,
  • Reduce the need for testing and evaluation against multiple classification systems.

Benefits to companies include:

  • A safer work environment and improved relations with employees,
  • An increase in efficiency and reduced costs from compliance with hazard communication regulations,
  • Application of expert systems resulting in maximizing expert resources and minimizing labor and costs,
  • Facilitation of electronic transmission systems with international scope,
  • Expanded use of training programs on health and safety,
  • Reduced costs due to fewer accidents and illnesses,
  • Improved corporate image and credibility.

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AIHA Releases IH Calculator App

AIHA recently released the free IH Calculator LITE  app, a calculator that aids industrial hygienists in performing OH&S calculations quickly and efficiently on their mobile device.  Topics include: Noise, Heat Stress, Ventilation, Exposure Assessment and is complimented with a range of conversions such as volume, distance, pressure, temperature, TLVs, and more.  The app is currently only available on Apple products (iOS).

Source: AIHA

Adequate Face Velocity for Laboratory Hoods

Multiple organizations have adopted laboratory hood safety standards to determine the effectiveness of a hood in limiting occupational exposure.  One such measure of determining the effectiveness of the hood is by measuring the speed of air entering the hood (i.e. the face velocity).  While face velocity is not the only test method for determining if a hood has the ability to adequately contain the contaminants (see ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods), it is the only performance standard cited by the following organizations.

  • OSHA – General air flow should not be turbulent and should be relatively uniform throughout the laboratory, with no high velocity or static areas (194, 195); airflow into and within the hood should not be excessively turbulent (200); hood face velocity should be adequate (typically 60-100 lfm)
  • NIOSH – The current consensus of the literature is that the average face velocity for a laboratory chemical hood should be in the range of 80–120 ft/min
  • Cal OSHA – The exhaust system shall provide an average face velocity of at least 100 feet per minute with a minimum of 70 fpm at any point, except where more stringent special requirements are prescribed
  • ANSI/AIHA Z9.5-2003 – Design face velocities for laboratory chemical hoods in the range of 80-100 fpm (0.41-0.51m/s) will provide adequate face velocity for a majority of chemical hoods. Hoods with excellent containment characteristics may operate adequately below 80 fpm (0.41 m/s) while others may require higher face velocities. Continue reading

HUD releases 2012 Guidelines for Evaluation and Control of Lead Paint in Housing

The Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing support HUD’s vision to reduce hazards in housing in a cost-effective manner while protecting the health of children.  TheGuidelines apply to lead hazard evaluation and control in all federally associated housing. This second edition of the Guidelines replaces the 1995 edition, with its lead-based paint inspection chapter revised in 1997.

These Guidelines can be used by those who are required to identify and control lead paint hazards, as well as property owners, landlords, and child-care center operators.  They offer helpful advice on renovations in older housing, lead-based paint inspections and risk assessments, and where to go for help.  The Guidelines also outline what users have to do to meet requirements and recommendations; identify training – and if applicable, certification – required for people who conduct the work; and describe how the work should be done.

The Guidelines complement regulations that have been issued by HUD, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and policies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

While compliance with the Guidelines is not required by law, a Federal, State, or local statute, regulation, legal agreement or other document may require that the Guidelines, or certain parts, be followed.

Source: HUD.gov

Free Online Safety and Training Courses

The state of Washington is offering some invaluable online safety and training courses on their website.  Topics include:

  • Accident Investigation
  • Safety Checklists
  • HAZCOM
  • Ergonomics
  • Fall Protection
  • Janitorial Services
  • Job Safety / Hazard Analyses
  • Lockout / Tagout
  • Noise
  • Process Safety Management (PSM)
  • and much more

You can find the courses and modules on the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries website.

Confessions of a Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) Examinee

OHShub.com interviews recent successful examinees of the Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) exam administered by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH).  The resultant text is as follows:


OHShub.com:  When did you decide to take the CIH exam?

Examinee:  I decided in 2003 to make it a goal of mine to obtain the CIH certification.

OHShub.com:  When did you obtain certification?

Examinee:  I actually obtained certification in May 2010.

OHShub.com:  What is your current career field and how do you feel it prepared you?

Examinee:  Currently I am in the consulting field.  I feel that it (i.e. being a consultant) prepared me by having the ability to complete a multitude of traditional IH projects.  The great thing about being a consultant is that there is always something new and fresh in meeting the needs of the client, which exposes you to a variety of the traditional “IH rubrics”.

OHShub.com:  How long had you been in the IH/Safety career field when you sat for the CIH exam?

Examinee:  Less than 10 years.  I believe it was actually 9 years.  While you can take the test after 5 years, I have always personally regarded the CIH designation highly.  I felt that it was important and wanted to have a certain “skillset” prior to sitting for the exam.

OHShub.com:  Are you saying that you did not just want to have a “certification” but wanted to be able to exemplify the characteristics of most CIH’s in the field?

Examinee:  Exactly.  That is precisely my thoughts and feelings.

OHShub.com:  What was/is your work/career-life like?

Examinee:  I consider myself very fortunate to have a very well qualified mentor (who is a CIH) and excellent IH support staff around me.  Personally, I feel that it would have been much more difficult to obtain such a high level IH skillset without those continuing resources.

OHShub.com:  Personally, how many hours do you think you studied in preparation for the CIH exam?

Examinee:  Great question.  But one that I thought about many times after many months of studying.  I’d imagine that I studied somewhere in the range of 700-800 hours in all.  Granted, this was over a few years.  However, over the final year leading up to the exam, the final breakdown was probably somewhere in the range of:

  • > 12 months out = 120 hours
  • 12 – 6 months out = 200 hours
  • 6  – 3 months out = 200 hours
  • 3 – 1 months out = 120 hours
  • < 1 month out = 60-90 hours

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Free Online Training Modules in Occupational Hygiene

The Occupational Hygiene Training Association (OHTA), has created a new website, www.OHLearning.com, where free course materials for international occupational hygiene training modules are posted.  Find training materials, learn about occupational hygiene, or develop your existing skillset.

Modules currently available include:

  • Noise
  • Asbestos
  • Measurement of Hazardous Substances
  • Health Effects of Hazardous Substances
  • Control of Hazardous Environments
  • Thermal Environments
  • Ergonomics
  • Basic Principles of Occupational Hygiene

According to the website, OHTA mission is as follows:

OHTA was formed to promote better standards of occupational hygiene practice throughout the world.  We develop training materials and make them freely available for use by students and training providers.  We also promote an international qualifications framework so that all hygienists are trained to a consistent, high standard, recognized in all participating countries.

Odor Thresholds, TLVs, OELs, IDLHs, and Respirator Selection Guide for Chemicals

3M Corporation put together a respiratory protection guide (download link at end of this article) that contains a wealth of information for OH&S professionals including:

  • Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) levels
  • Odor Thresholds
  • Occupational Exposure Levels (OELs)
  • Respiratory Protection Selection Guide

IDLH’s are published by NIOSH and “refers to the acute respiratory exposure that poses an immediate threat of loss of life, immediate or delayed irreversible adverse effects on health, or acute eye exposure that would prevent escape from a hazardous atmosphere.”

With reference to odor thresholds it should be noted:

The method of defining and determining odor thresholds varies widely, thereby giving rise to a significant range of reported odor thresholds for many substances. Individuals may also respond differently to the same odor. At a given concentration, one person may smell and recognize the odor, while another person may barely notice it. The odor thresholds reported in the literature are typically determined for a single constituent, with no other chemicals present in the air. The single constituent situation rarely occurs in the workplace. Therefore, caution must be exercised in using these numbers.

Referenced OELs are based upon ACGIH’s TLVs, except where noted in the chart.

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Results for OHShub.com’s Occupational Health & Safety Salary Survey


The results are in from OHShub.com‘s Occupational Health & Safety Salary Survey.  300 Occupational Health and Safety Professionals responded to the survey request for information pertaining to career length, certifications, salary, geographic location, etc.  The results are as follows:

Of the 297 respondents, nearly three quarters were male.

Age followed a typical bell curve with the majority of respondents being between 35-60 years of age.

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Return on Investment (ROI) for Early Ergonomic Intervention

The Canadian Occupational Safety webzine recently published an article regarding the types of returns companies can expect from early ergonomic intervention.  The purpose of the article was to “to show the business case for using ergonomic and accessible design early in the design/build, move, renovation and/or purchase phase” and their numbers sound convincing.  Jane Sleeth, managing director and consultant with Optimal Performance Consultants, stated that the cases they have worked on have shown significant ROI when sound ergonomic principles are used in the early stages of workplace/work-process design.

Most importantly are the numbers discussed.  Sleeth states that,

Over the last 20 years, we found that businesses that use ergonomics and human factors at the initial phase of purchasing, design, move and/or build projects save anywhere from 15 percent to as high as 700 percent in follow up consulting fees, modifications and retrofits, as well as additional capital purchase costs.

To view the article, visit the COS website HERE.

AIHA Survey Highlights the Profession’s Attitudes

AIHA recently conducted a survey to assess the attitudes pertaining to the profession of the membership base. Highlights include the following:

  • Most respondents expected to see an increase  in work related stress.
  • Many respondents expected to see work hours increase
  • A majority of respondents support/would support fines & penalties and as a result expect it to be more difficult to report problems as they arise
  • 50% have 25+ years of experience.
  • Respondents are seeking professional development and certification in multiple formats, including online programs and distance learning

Further information will be provided in OHShub.com’s 2010 Occupational Health & Safety Salary Survey.  Stay tuned for the results.

Source:  AIHA.org