Template


Simple Safety Action Item Tracking Log Template

What Get’s Measured, Get’s Managed

If your workplace is not tracking safety action items, you are missing a real opportunity to show progress, build culture, create a safer work environment, and manage your safety systems. As Peter Drucker is quoted as saying,

What get’s measured, get’s managed.

You don’t need to go out and pay hundreds of dollars per year, per user, or any variation thereof. Excel (or even Google Sheets) can be an effective method of tracking open safety action items and ensuring that those items move towards the ultimate goal of completion.

OHShub.com Free Template – Safety Action Item Tracking Log

OHShub has generated a quick excel safety action item tracking log that you can use within your facility. Modify it as you need to fit your work environment (add departments, person who identified, etc.).

The tracking log template includes conditional formatting, which highlights action items that are coming due (within 30 days) in ORANGE, and overdue items in RED. Completed items are GREEN. Additionally, the spreadsheet can be filtered by status, date, person responsible, priority, or any combination thereof.


Guide for Developing Job Safety Analyses & Safe Work Procedures

While Administrative Controls may not be the most effective hazard control method, they are still extremely valuable to sustainable an lasting change in most organizations.

What is a Job Safety Analysis or Safe Work Procedure?

Job Safety Analyses (JSA) and Safety Work Procedures (SWP) (also known as job hazard analysis/analyses, pre job plan, safe work plan, etc.) are step by step instructions for doing work the right way. JSAs and SWPs identify the materials and equipment needed, how and when to use them, and usually include:

  • regulatory requirements;
  • personal protective equipment requirements;
  • training requirements;
  • responsibilities of each person involved in the job;
  • a specific sequence of steps to follow to complete the work safely; permits required;
  • emergency procedures.

Why Use a JSA or SWP?

JSAs and SWPs are generally prepared for jobs that:

  • are critical (high risk jobs where accidents have or could result in severe injuries);
  • are hazardous and where accidents occur frequently;
  • new or have been changed;
  • have had new equipment added;
  • require many detailed tasks;
  • involve two or more workers who must perform specific tasks simultaneously;
  • are done infrequently.

10 Steps to Create a Job Safety Analysis (JSA) or Safe Work Procedure (SWP)

  1. An easy way to develop a job safety analysis or safe work procedure procedure is to break the task into small steps. For each step, determine the hazards and ways to correct them. Some hazards to think about include: being struck by moving equipment; coming in contact with hazardous substances; hitting obstructions or other workers; becoming caught in machinery; falling; being struck by objects falling from above; suffering from exposure to toxic gases, insufficient oxygen or extreme temperatures.
  2. You can then use the breakdown of hazards and corrective measures to prepare a written JSA or SWP. Consider using the following process to develop your safe work procedures. List all jobs on your work sites that meet the criteria above. Concentrate on those that have potential for: serious injuries; frequent injures; severe property damage; significant interruptions to production; public liability; government intervention.
  3. Put the list of jobs in order by the degree of hazard they present and the frequency they are performed.
  4. Analyze each job by observing and interviewing workers. Record the following information: job name and location; each step of the job and its hazards; roles of each worker involved; special equipment required; applicable regulatory requirements.
  5. Determine the measures needed to control job hazards, such as: engineering controls to eliminate hazards; worker training; personal protective and safety equipment; hazard markings; safety meetings.
  6. If engineering controls or worker training can be used to permanently eliminate or reduce the impact of hazards, implement them.
  7. Prepare your safe work procedure by listing (in order of occurrence) each: step of the job; control measure required (excluding one time measures such as engineering controls and development of training); regulatory requirement; special equipment required; specific training requirement for workers (e.g., BOP Level l or journeyman electrician).
  8. Test the procedure in the field to ensure it: is accurate; meets regulatory requirements; is understandable to workers.
  9. Finalize the written procedure and place it at appropriate work sites.
  10. Train workers in the procedures.

Quick Safety Observation Card – Free Template


OHShub.com Quick Safety Observation Card (front)

Performing safety observations are one of the easiest and most effective methods of checking the pulse of the safety culture in your organization. Through safety observations, you are able to observe and understand actual safety-related conditions and behaviors in your facility, and more importantly, do something about it. The results of your safety observations should lead to:

  • a ‘Thank You’ (observing a safe behavior),
  • a ‘Conversation’ (observing an unsafe behavior), or
  • an ‘Action’ (observing an unsafe condition).
OHShub.com Quick Safety Observation Card (back)

The OSHhub.com Quick Safety Observation template (.pdf format) provides a quick method to document a safety observation for entry into your facility’s safety tracking system. Note: The cards are pocket sized (approximately 3″x5″) and should be printed front and back. 4 cards are on each 8.5″ x 11″ sheet of paper. Download the Word format HERE.

Basis for Conducting Safety Observations

Carnegie Mellon recently did a study where they reviewed 112 Million Safety Observations from 15,000 worksites.  From the review of the data, they were able to develop predictive models that were between 90-97% effective in predicting injuries.  And it boiled down to 4 factors of influence.  The 4 Safety Truths.

4 Safety Truths

  1. More inspections predict a safer worksite.
    • More eyes increases safety.
  2. More inspectors, specifically outside of the safety function, predict a safer worksite.
    • Getting everyone involved, increases safety.
  3. Too many 100% safe inspections predicts an unsafe worksite. 
    • You are flying blind.
    • Encourage finding of “unsafes” to increase safety.
  4. Too many unsafe inspections predicts an unsafe worksite. 
    • Self-explanatory.

What Kind of Observer are You?

  1. Balanced – documents safe/unsafe behaviors & unsafe conditions, equally
  2. Pencil Whipper – documents only safe behaviors or conditions
  3. Non-Confronter – does not document behaviors, only conditions
  4. Fault Finder – does not document safe behaviors, only unsafe
  5. Non-Participant – does not document , i.e. “I’m too busy”