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HUD releases 2012 Guidelines for Evaluation and Control of Lead Paint in Housing

The Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing support HUD’s vision to reduce hazards in housing in a cost-effective manner while protecting the health of children.  TheGuidelines apply to lead hazard evaluation and control in all federally associated housing. This second edition of the Guidelines replaces the 1995 edition, with its lead-based paint inspection chapter revised in 1997.

These Guidelines can be used by those who are required to identify and control lead paint hazards, as well as property owners, landlords, and child-care center operators.  They offer helpful advice on renovations in older housing, lead-based paint inspections and risk assessments, and where to go for help.  The Guidelines also outline what users have to do to meet requirements and recommendations; identify training – and if applicable, certification – required for people who conduct the work; and describe how the work should be done.

The Guidelines complement regulations that have been issued by HUD, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and policies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

While compliance with the Guidelines is not required by law, a Federal, State, or local statute, regulation, legal agreement or other document may require that the Guidelines, or certain parts, be followed.


CPSC, EPA, HUD, CDC, and ATSDR Release Initial Chinese Drywall Studies


The interagency task force on Chinese drywall is releasing today the initial results of several studies that begin to assemble pieces in the overall Chinese drywall puzzle. The investigation continues and
additional reports will be released in November.

In sum, the three studies released today are:

  • Elemental and Chemical Testing: The study of the elemental and chemical composition of 17 drywall samples shows higher concentrations of elemental sulfur and strontium in Chinese drywall than in non-Chinese drywall.
  • Chamber Studies: Preliminary results of ongoing testing to detect gases emitted from drywall
    in laboratory chambers show higher emissions of total volatile sulfur gases from Chinese than
    from non-Chinese drywall.
  • Indoor Air Studies: Indoor air testing of 10 homes in Florida and Louisiana was conducted to
    identify and measure contaminants and to inform a drywall home indoor air testing protocol.
    This data from a small sample of homes, allows preliminary observations of certain chemicals in
    the indoor air. The tests did not detect the presence or found only very limited or occasional
    indications of sulfur compounds of particular interest – hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and
    carbonyl sulfide. Concentrations of two known irritant compounds, acetaldehyde and
    formaldehyde, were detected in both homes with and without Chinese drywall, and at
    concentrations that could exacerbate conditions such as asthma in sensitive populations. The
    levels of formaldehyde were not unusual for new homes, however, and were higher when the
    homes were not air conditioned.

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