GHS

2 posts

GHS Infographic – Only the Facts

Sitehawk.com recently published an infographic detailing the pertinent facts relating to the implementation of GHS.  While GHS has historically focused on the international community, with early adoption by the European Union and Japan, the GHS trend is moving west and will definitely be in the spotlight in the U.S. in 2012. GHS has already had and will continue to have profound effects on chemical data management initiatives, both for companies that must author and publish material safety data sheets (M)SDS for their chemical products, as well as those companies that must manage (M)SDS and related chemical data for onsite chemical inventories.  Below is a summary of the highlights.

Source: Sitehawk.com

Globally Harmonized System (GHS) Introductory Overview & Webinar

The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labeling of chemicals.  The GHS provides 3 basic elements for classification and labeling:

  • Define health, physical & environmental hazards
  • Classify the hazards
  • Communicate the hazards throughout the workforce via labels and Safety Data Sheets (SDS) – note: comparison of SDS and MSDS

(For a side-by-side comparison of the current hazard communication standard and the new standard, click HERE.)

While not a regulation or a standard, GHS is an attempt to standardize the method in which hazards are communicated in the workplace.  It is anticipated that application of the GHS will:

  • Enhance the protection of human health and the environment by providing an internationally comprehensible system,
  • Provide a recognized framework to develop regulations for those countries without existing systems,
  • Facilitate international trade in chemicals whose hazards have been identified on an international basis,
  • Reduce the need for testing and evaluation against multiple classification systems.

Benefits to companies include:

  • A safer work environment and improved relations with employees,
  • An increase in efficiency and reduced costs from compliance with hazard communication regulations,
  • Application of expert systems resulting in maximizing expert resources and minimizing labor and costs,
  • Facilitation of electronic transmission systems with international scope,
  • Expanded use of training programs on health and safety,
  • Reduced costs due to fewer accidents and illnesses,
  • Improved corporate image and credibility.

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